The Second City returns to Egyptian Theatre with stories of 'hilarity of heartbreak'

The Second City returns with stories of ‘hilarity of heartbreak’

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DeKALB – Dating your best friend for the first time. Heartbreak after breaking up with a significant other for the first time. Getting divorced and seeing somebody else in a relationship.

These are the types of scenarios that The Second City will explore – with a funny twist – during its show “It’s Not You, It’s Me,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St.

Whether you’re single, engaged, married or “it’s complicated,” there’s always something to laugh at for all stages of relationships, said Jeanine Holcomb, marketing and communications director for the Egyptian Theatre.

“It’s finding hilarity in heartbreak, basically,” Holcomb said.

Jonald Reyes, director for the Chicago-based theatrical company, said it’s the company’s 60th anniversary, and the Saturday show will include some “best hits” and some archival material. He said some material also will include actors singing musical numbers speaking to more progressive times and how relationships can be in this day and age.

“This show itself is really a fun culmination of what it’s like to go through love and heartbreak all at the same time,” Reyes said.

Other topics in the show include parents’ relationships and experiences on taking care of kids.

“We have a crazy bag of funny sketches here for the audience to watch,” Reyes said.

Ticket prices start at $22 for adults and $17 for students and seniors older than 65. They can be bought at the box office between 3 and 6 p.m. Thursday or one hour before the performance or online at egyptiantheatre.org.

Holcomb said The Second City last performed at the Egyptian about a year ago and also performed there before then. She said the company performs a few prepared skits, but each performance is totally different because much of the performance is improvised.

“We’re really excited that they like coming back here and they keep coming back here,” Holcomb said. “Our audiences really seem to enjoy their shows.”

Holcomb said The Second City has been well-attended in the past and tends to be a very last-minute buy for audience members. On top of the heavily improvised show, she said, the show is totally catered to the audience, with local references and the cast interacting with audience members.

“I think a lot of people attend because they think, ‘I wonder if I’m seeing the next Amy Poehler on stage at the Egyptian,’ ” Holcomb said.