Crime Brief

Huntley man receives prison sentence for possessing child pornography

Jeffrey L. Gwin was sentenced to prison for possessing child pornography in 2019 and uploading it to cloud storage, according to a news release

A Huntley man, previously convicted in the 1990s of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison for a separate possession of child pornography conviction.

Jeffrey L. Gwin was sentenced to prison Tuesday for possessing child pornography in 2019 and uploading it to online cloud storage, according to a news release the Illinois Attorney General’s Office sent Tuesday.

Gwin pleaded guilty in February to possession of child pornography and financial exploitation of an elderly person. Earlier this month, Gwin was sentenced to four years in prison for the financial exploitation charge, which was filed as a separate Kane County case. Gwin will serve both prison sentences consecutively for a total of 20 years, according to the release.

He also is required to register as a sex offender as a condition of his sentence. Gwin was previously convicted of aggravated criminal sexual abuse in 1992, according to the release.

Reached by phone Tuesday, the Kane County Public Defender’s Office declined to comment.

Prosecutors alleged that Gwin possessed child pornography involving a child younger than 13 years old. He was arrested on June 25, 2019, after investigators from Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul’s office and the Huntley Police Department used a warrant to search Gwin’s Huntley home, according to the release. There, investigators discovered “evidence of child pornography,” according to the release.

The Attorney General’s Office prosecuted the case with assistance from Kane County State’s Attorney Jamie L. Mosser’s office. Mosser’s office had charged Gwin separately with financial exploitation of an elderly person. Gwin pleaded guilty to that charge in February and was sentenced Oct. 14 to four years in prison. That sentence and the sentence for Gwin’s child pornography conviction will run consecutively.

“The possession of child pornography is not a victimless crime,” Mosser said in an official statement. “These children continue to be victimized every time someone views or disseminates these images and videos.”